INPAWS Grant Program Guidelines

INPAWS supports well-conceived grant projects that are in line with our mission:

  • To promote the appreciation, preservation, scientific study, and use of plants native to Indiana.

  • To teach people about their beauty, diversity, and importance to our environment.

Specifications

  • Awards range from $400 to $1,000. Awards over $1,000 may be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  • All requests must be made in writing using the on-line Application Form (in process) with a clear statement of how the award would further the mission of INPAWS.

  • Grant funds are available only for sites that are open to the public and may not be used for transportation, labor, lodging, or refreshment costs.

  • Grant applications for expenses related to school trips (bus driver, gas, naturalist) to natural sites (preserves, environmental centers) that will give youth a meaningful exposure to native plants, habitats, and the chain of life should be submitted to Letha’s Fund at http://www.inpaws.org/education/letha/ and not to this grant program.

  • Successful awardees must recognize INPAWS as a funding source in all printed materials, signs, or publicity generated through the project.

Grant Application Procedure

Applicants must submit their proposal online using the form that will be provided early in 2018. 

The following content will be included:

  1. Summary, including: name of project; amount requested; location; applicant/contact person information (name, address, telephone, email); name of specific person/organization to whom award checks would be payable; new or existing project; category that best describes the project—Research, Land Management and Conservation, or Demonstration Garden; prior INPAWS funding.

  2. Text of proposal, not to exceed two pages: (a) Summary of the project, not to exceed 60 words; (b) Clear, concise description of the project, including:

  • How does the project further the INPAWS mission?

  • Why is the project needed?

  • Specific objectives to be achieved.

  • For any project establishing native vegetation or controlling invasive vegetation, specific steps to be used to achieve the objectives (e.g. how will planting site be prepared, what method of control will be used).

  • Specific information on how INPAWS grant funds would be used.

  • Who benefits from the project—number who benefit and how.

  • Brief description of organizations supporting project, and how they are involved.

  • Financial resources committed to the project from other sources, if any.

  • Project anticipated starting and completion dates.

  • Maintenance plan for any project that involves establishing native vegetation or control of invasive vegetation.

  1. Budget sheet to include line items showing: (a) labor, material, and program costs; (b) sources and amounts of funds already raised, if any; and (c) total cost of the project.

  2. Detailed species list, if applicable, of all plants and seeds to be used. This may be included either as an additional sheet or as part of the proposal text. Note that INPAWS will not fund projects that utilize species nonnative to Indiana.

Criteria for Judging Grant Applications

Every grant application must meet the INPAWS mission, which is “to promote the appreciation, preservation, scientific study, and use of plants native to Indiana and to teach people about their beauty, diversity, and importance to our environment.”

In addition, the following criteria will be used to judge applications in each category:

Research Category  

Must involve research on either a native plant (propagation/habitat needs/life cycle/restoration), or the control of an invasive plant that threatens native plants.  

  • Will the research benefit rare plant species? (yes=more points)

  • How well are they working with partners on this project (e.g., do they have funding coming from other sources, are they working with a state or federal agency or land trust?

  • How feasible is the project (can they execute the project within the timeline proposed)?

  • Is there a clear hypothesis?  Or is this more of an exploratory project?

  • Is there an outreach component to the project (i.e., plans to present at a conference, publish findings, etc.)?

  • How well written and thoughtful is the application? Is the purpose clear?

Land Management and Conservation Category 

Involves projects that ecologically manage and/or restore natural areas (for instance, removing invasive plants from forests, planting prairie in the part of the state where prairie is native) or protecting natural areas through acquisition.

  • How great is the project ecological benefit? (e.g., is the site involved a high quality natural area rather than a low quality, disturbed site).

  • If vegetation removal is involved, is the method clearly described and appropriate (e.g., cut and paint woody invasives, etc.)?

  • If planting is involved, is the preparation of the planting site clearly described (e.g., removal of invasives)?

  • If planting is involved, are the native plants the right species for the project as described (e.g., actually native and fit the site conditions)?

  • Have they thought through and provided for long-term maintenance of the project?
  • How well are they working with partners on this project (e.g., do they have funding coming from other sources, are volunteer organizations helping with the labor?).

  • How feasible is the project—do they appear to have the contacts, resources and skills to be successful? Is the project appropriately sized for the group?

  • How many people will see/benefit from this land management and restoration?

  • How well written and thoughtful is the application? Is the purpose clear?

Demonstration Garden Category

This would include demonstration gardens at any public site.

  • Is the preparation of the planting site clearly described (e.g., removal of invasives, preparation of soil)?

  • Are the native plants the right species for the project as described (e.g., actually native to Indiana, and fit the site conditions)?

  • Have they thought through and provided for long-term maintenance of the demonstration garden?

  • How many people will see/benefit from this garden?

  • How well written and thoughtful is the application? Is the purpose clear?

 

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